Living Walls

Living Walls

Due to habitat loss and a decrease in their natural prey, large carnivores are living closer to humans than ever before. As a result, they often turn to the livestock of local herders for an easy meal. The death of a cow, goat, or sheep represents a serious loss for rural people, who may kill wild predators in retaliation. To reduce this type of human-wildlife conflict, APW partners with communities to build Living Walls—environmentally-friendly corrals that keep livestock safe.

Designed hand-in-hand with local people, Living Walls are in high demand across northern Tanzania. Local involvement is strong, with individual owners contributing 25 percent of the cost. APW’s Warriors for Wildlife team monitors Living Wall conditions to ensure that the structures remain effective over time.

A recent study shows that people who own Living Walls are more likely to be positive and optimistic about coexisting with large carnivores. To date, more than 900 Living Walls are positively impacting 13,500 people and keeping more than 170,000 livestock safe every night. Living Walls have led to the planting of more than 105,000 living Commiphora trees. 

Benefits of Living Walls

  • Protect livestock from attack
  • Prevent the retaliatory killing of wildlife
  • Uplift livelihoods
  • Improve local attitudes toward large carnivores
  • Contribute to habitat preservation
  • Demonstrate the value of shared knowledge
  • Exhibit culturally appropriate solutions

Learn how a Living Wall has improved the life of a Maasai herder and his family.

Benefits of Living Walls

  • Protect livestock from attack
  • Prevent the retaliatory killing of wildlife
  • Uplift livelihoods
  • Improve local attitudes toward large carnivores
  • Contribute to habitat preservation
  • Demonstrate the value of shared knowledge
  • Exhibit culturally appropriate solutions

Learn how a Living Wall has improved the life of a Maasai herder and his family.

Rafael-compressor

BUILDING A LIVING WALL

A Commiphora tree branch used in one of APW's Living Walls
Step One
Limbs of living Commiphora trees are sustainably harvested.
Chain-link fencing is wrapped around a circle of trees to build a Living Wall.
Step Three
Grounded by the furrow, chain-link fencing is wrapped around the trees.
A furrow is dug around a circle of trees during the construction of a Living Wall.
Step Two
The trees are planted in a circle, and a furrow is dug around the perimeter.
Chain-link fencing is secured to the trees of a Living Wall.
Step Four
The chain-link fencing is secured to the trees, which continue to grow and add height to the wall.

BUILDING A LIVING WALL

A Commiphora tree branch used in one of APW's Living Walls
Step One
Limbs of living Commiphora trees are sustainably harvested.
A furrow is dug around a circle of trees during the construction of a Living Wall.
Step Two
The trees are planted in a circle, and a furrow is dug around the perimeter.
Chain-link fencing is wrapped around a circle of trees to build a Living Wall.
Step Three
Grounded by the furrow, chain-link fencing is wrapped around the trees.
Chain-link fencing is secured to the trees of a Living Wall.
Step Four
The chain-link fencing is secured to the trees, which continue to grow and add height to the wall.
A young boy enters a Living Wall in northern Tanzania

“Our Living Walls are 99.9% successful in preventing attacks on livestock, which results in fewer retaliatory lion killings. No lions have been killed at homesteads where Living Walls are installed.”

DR. LALY LICHTENFELD, CO-FOUNDER AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, AFRICAN PEOPLE & WILDLIFE

P.O. Box 11306

Arusha, Tanzania

+255 767 172 086

P.O. Box 624

Bernardsville, NJ 07924

+1 (908) 642-1540

CONNECT WITH US
STAY UP TO DATE

P.O. Box 11306

Arusha, Tanzania

+255 767 172 086

P.O. Box 624

Bernardsville, NJ 07924

+1 (908) 642-1540

CONNECT WITH US
STAY UP TO DATE
CONNECT WITH US
STAY UP TO DATE
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